Interview with Kristin Ross | May ’68: Beyond Artificial Commemorations and Remembrances

Interview by Yavor Tarinski. You can find the interview in Greek here.

κριστιν-ρος-συνέντευξηyyytyyt-1-750x464Kristin Ross gave an interview for Babylonia journal, analyzing the meanings and significances of May ’68. She will be speaker at this year’s B-Fest (25th-26th-27th of May in the Fine Arts School in Athens). Ross is a professor of comparative literature at New York University and author of many books like “May ’68 and Its Afterlives”, “The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune” and “Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune”. Continue reading “Interview with Kristin Ross | May ’68: Beyond Artificial Commemorations and Remembrances”

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Interview with Redneck Revolt: Arms Possession & Social Anti-fascism in U.S.A.

Interview with Redneck Revolt by Yavor Tarinski and Kostas Savvopoulos for Babylonia Journal. You can find the interview in Greek here.

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On this year’s B-Fest in Athens we have with us people from the RedneckRevolt movement from the U.S. (25th-26th-27th of May in the Fine Arts School in Athens). Redneck Revolt was founded in 2016 as an anti-racist, anti-fascist network of community defense formations. Continue reading “Interview with Redneck Revolt: Arms Possession & Social Anti-fascism in U.S.A.”

Self-Limitation and Democracy

By Yavor Tarinski

9687368356_6c01d3ea58_b-750x375[F]or the impulse of mere appetite is slavery, while obedience to a self-prescribed law is liberty.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau[1]

The philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis has often been credited with saying that “democracy is the regime of self-limitation.” [2] But since for him the only true democratic form is direct democracy, this claim might seem a bit odd. Direct democracy has come to be conceived by many, including several critics, as a regime that disconnects society from laws and regulations, resulting in its depolitization and degradation. This concept has understandably raised concerns about what would be the outcomes of the more excessive actions of the masses. Continue reading “Self-Limitation and Democracy”

A coffee with Jacques Rancière beneath the Acropolis

Yavor Tarinski, Yannis Ktenas, Alexandros Schismenos, Nikos Ioannou, Nikos Katsiaounis and Ioanna Maravelidi, from the editorial team of Babylonia, in conversation with Jacques Ranciere, during B-Fest 6, 2017.

 ranciere acropolis Continue reading “A coffee with Jacques Rancière beneath the Acropolis”

Political Parties: Obstacle to Democracy

By Yavor Tarinski

Neverending RaceIf understood to the letter, a Democracy must be a stateless society. Power belongs to the people insofar as the people exercise it themselves
Giovanni Sartori [1]

The contemporary political model, vulgarly named democracy, is undergoing deep crisis, which can be attributed to many of its systemic features and the political parties are among the main reasons for it. The Party, once encompassing massive social support and powerful movements, has become today synonymous with dishonesty, greed for power and corruption. Many have embarked on journey to recreate it in different ways that strive at mimicking the grassroots, decentralized character of contemporary social movements and the internet. Continue reading “Political Parties: Obstacle to Democracy”

Ecological Struggles in the Neoliberal Era

By Antonis Broumas and Yavor Tarinski

milada-vigerova-35578-384x2531. Introduction

Life on this planet, as we know it, is a result of fragile environmental conditions that the contemporary predominant neoliberal system has already began to alter. Capitalism and its doctrine of unlimited economic growth seems to completely neglect this dependency and continues to violently exploit nature for the benefit of tiny elites, thus increasing their already enormous power. Continue reading “Ecological Struggles in the Neoliberal Era”

Commons, Social Ecology and the Transcending of Capitalism

By Yavor Tarinski

scncc2Introduction

Life on this planet, as we know it, is a result of fragile environmental conditions that the contemporary predominant neoliberal system has already began to alter. Capitalism and its doctrine of unlimited economic growth seems to completely neglect this dependency and continues to violently exploit nature for the benefit of tiny elites, thus increasing their already enormous power. Continue reading “Commons, Social Ecology and the Transcending of Capitalism”

Commons: From free access to democratic management

By Yavor Tarinski

ecology 3The commons offers a framework and a process for effectively and equitably stewarding of the resources communities need to live in dignity. If we have a collective right to a resource, we should be able to participate in decisions about that resource’s use.[…] So what about this for a radical idea: let people participate in the decisions that most directly affect their everyday lives.

-Chris Tittle[1]

During the last years there has been an increasing interest in the paradigm of the commons. Much have been written and done in this field. There has been an explosion in digital commoning with new platform co-ops, wiki-projects and free software to be successfully challenging the domination of corporations in this sphere. But advances have been made and in the non-digital world, with urban agricultural projects, charters of rights and municipal platforms being developed and experimented with. Continue reading “Commons: From free access to democratic management”